What animal are you?

 

What Animal Are You?
 
Take author Stefan Swanepoel’s quiz and find out!
Take the quiz at http://whatanimalami.com

 

More than 20,000 people–mostly real estate practitioners–have taken Stefan Swanepoel’s intriguing “What Animal Am I?” quiz. The quiz accompanies his new book Surviving the Serengeti (John Wiley & Sons, 2011), which draws business survival skills from the animal life in Africa’s diverse Serengeti region. So far, crocodiles are winning out as the “animal” most prevalent in the real estate world.

 Here’s a breakdown of where quiz respondents have landed to date: 

31% Enterprising Crocodile If you’re like the crocodile, you possess the energy, creativity, and ambition required to see the possibilities in the future that others cannot. Enterprising individuals are passionate about work, learn from mistakes and understand their weaknesses as well as their innate strengths.

 24% Graceful Giraffe Individuals in this category develop interdependent relationships that are fostered through patience, self-discipline, dignity, honor, and respect. They recognize others’ strengths and weaknesses. Grace is a disposition that requires compassion toward others and the desire to extend good will.

 13% Communicating Elephant Successful relationships—in both business and life—depend on good communication. Effective communicators understand that it’s not always best to use a lot of words. These people understand how critical verbal and nonverbal exchanges are.

 10% Strategic Lion It’s all or nothing. If the lion’s strategy fails, it goes hungry. For people whose primary skill is strategy, it’s all about organizing their thoughts, ideas, experiences, skills, expertise, and expectations to accomplish the desired goal. Strategy is not just about the end; it’s the means to that end.

 8% Efficient Cheetah The cheetah finishes the job in the shortest possible time with the least amount of wasted resources. The ability to overcome interruptions, distractions, mistakes, and mental and physical fatigue is key, as is the ability to focus on being effective and producing the desired results.

 7% Risk-taking Mongoose The mongoose evaluates all the options before making a decision. This type of person frequently reviews goals and determines the various routes to get to the destination. Often, they’ll choose the path with the highest risk to gain the maximum reward.

7% Enduring Wildebeest Endurance, in its simplest form, is the ability to apply yourself for relatively long periods of time. This quality keeps your mind going when your body wants to quit and gives you the mental capacity to continue moving forward, despite obstacles, hardships, pain, or fatigue.

>Is this really a buyer’s market?

>

With falling home prices and higher inventories, most of the public views real estate as a “buyer’s market,” in which buyers hold more of the control and sellers will more eagerly accept lower offers just to sell.
Not so fast, say buyers and sellers. More buyers are finding the sellers in the driver’s seat.
Buyer Young Hammack gave up looking for homes for a while after being outbid on three properties in California. “It’s a false buyer’s market,” Hammack says. “If you think prices are cheap, wait until you start putting offers in.”
Many sellers may be unable or unwilling to lower their home prices — mostly because they may be underwater on their mortgage — so buyers are increasingly finding lower offers than list price denied. Buyers, on the other hand, may be reluctant to agree to a deal if they don’t feel like they are getting it at a deep discount, industry insiders say.
Traditional buyers also are finding even buying a foreclosure can be difficult as they’re increasingly outbid by investors who are willing to pay cash.
“There’s a shortage of attractive inventory,” says Glenn Kelman, chief executive of Redfin Corp. “Customers just keep getting outbid on the houses that they want.”
Real estate professional Steve Capen with Keller Williams Realty in St. Petersburg, Fla., says that the homes most in demand among buyers often don’t require much repair work and are located in good school districts and choice neighborhoods near transit hubs.
“What’s selling is the cream of the crop, and they sell fast,” Capen says. “If it’s not cream of the crop, it’s getting hammered.”
Source: “Buyers’ Market? Stressed Sellers Say Not So Fast,” The Wall Street Journal online (April 25, 2011)

Is this really a buyer’s market?

With falling home prices and higher inventories, most of the public views real estate as a “buyer’s market,” in which buyers hold more of the control and sellers will more eagerly accept lower offers just to sell.
Not so fast, say buyers and sellers. More buyers are finding the sellers in the driver’s seat.
Buyer Young Hammack gave up looking for homes for a while after being outbid on three properties in California. “It’s a false buyer’s market,” Hammack says. “If you think prices are cheap, wait until you start putting offers in.”
Many sellers may be unable or unwilling to lower their home prices — mostly because they may be underwater on their mortgage — so buyers are increasingly finding lower offers than list price denied. Buyers, on the other hand, may be reluctant to agree to a deal if they don’t feel like they are getting it at a deep discount, industry insiders say.
Traditional buyers also are finding even buying a foreclosure can be difficult as they’re increasingly outbid by investors who are willing to pay cash.
“There’s a shortage of attractive inventory,” says Glenn Kelman, chief executive of Redfin Corp. “Customers just keep getting outbid on the houses that they want.”
Real estate professional Steve Capen with Keller Williams Realty in St. Petersburg, Fla., says that the homes most in demand among buyers often don’t require much repair work and are located in good school districts and choice neighborhoods near transit hubs.
“What’s selling is the cream of the crop, and they sell fast,” Capen says. “If it’s not cream of the crop, it’s getting hammered.”
Source: “Buyers’ Market? Stressed Sellers Say Not So Fast,” The Wall Street Journal online (April 25, 2011)